Build a sturdy deck and you'll get years of enjoyment from it. The elements can be tough on a deck, so maintenance is key. Inspect it once or twice a year and make repairs as soon as you spot damage. This saves time and money in the long run.


More Science from Scientific American

Science news and technology updates from Scientific American

Cosmic Conflict: Diverging Data on Universe's Expansion Polarizes Scientists

Wed, 16 May 2018 10:45:00 GMT

A disagreement between two canonical measures of intergalactic distances could signal a renaissance in physics—or deep flaws in our studies of cosmic evolution

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Great Ape Makes Good Doc

Wed, 16 May 2018 21:00:00 GMT

Orangutans were observed to use plant extracts to treat their own pain.

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


A New Book Looks at What Life Is Like for Moms across the Animal Kingdom

Sun, 13 May 2018 13:00:00 GMT

Some moms can be murder on the family

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Will NASA Go Nuclear to Return to the Moon?

Tue, 15 May 2018 10:45:00 GMT

A new reactor design could make nuclear-powered space exploration cheap, reliable and safe

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Maria Agnesi, the Greatest Female Mathematician You've Never Heard of

Wed, 16 May 2018 12:00:00 GMT

Born 300 years ago this month, Agnesi was the first woman to write a mathematics textbook and to be appointed to a university chair in math

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Exoplanet Everests May Be Detectable When Giant Telescopes Come Online

Mon, 14 May 2018 12:00:00 GMT

Astronomers have proposed a way of finding mountains, oceans and volcanoes on distant planets that are much too small to observe directly

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Interior's Handling of Science Gives Climate Advocates a Sense of Déjà Vu

Tue, 15 May 2018 15:15:00 GMT

Climate science is being sidelined and ignored at the department, watchdogs say

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Gunshot Sensors Pinpoint Destructive "Fish Bombs"

Fri, 18 May 2018 10:45:00 GMT

Technology developed for urban crimes can help localize blasts that destroy coral reefs

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


NASA Will Send a Helicopter to Mars in 2020

Mon, 14 May 2018 16:00:00 GMT

The autonomous rotorcraft will fly to the Red Planet with the Mars 2020 rover

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Chemotherapy Timing Could Influence How Well the Treatment Works

Sun, 13 May 2018 12:00:00 GMT

Circadian clocks influence DNA repair processes

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Countries with Less Gender Equity Have More Women in STEM--Huh?

Thu, 17 May 2018 11:00:00 GMT

It seems like a paradox, but it may have more to do with how we measure equity

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Why SpaceX's "Block 5" Is a Big Deal

Sat, 19 May 2018 13:00:00 GMT

Psst! Want a used rocket? I've got a lovely one for you, ready to fly today

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


The New Biography of the Sun

Thu, 17 May 2018 13:30:00 GMT

Our closest star has a much more exciting biography than scientists once assumed. New research illuminates the sun's past and potential future

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Sexual Selection at Chicheley Hall

Sat, 19 May 2018 19:00:00 GMT

A meeting of horned beetles and dinosaurs, peacocks and cichlid fishes…

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Stool-Pigeon Poop Reveals Bird-Racing Fouls

Wed, 16 May 2018 01:20:00 GMT

Racing pigeons is big business—and doping is common. Now scientists have devised a way to detect doping in the avian athletes. Christopher Intagliata reports.

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


The Sun, Supercharging Babies and the Eternal Search for Knowledge

Tue, 15 May 2018 13:20:00 GMT



-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


The Race Is on to Mine and Protect the Deep Seafloor

Mon, 14 May 2018 13:00:00 GMT

The race is on to exploit—and protect—the ocean floor

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Nuclear Bomb Test Moved North Korea Mountain

Mon, 14 May 2018 18:00:00 GMT

A new analysis of a seismic signal suggests the entire mountain didn’t collapse

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Kilauea's Next Eruptions May Mirror a Big One in Its Past

Tue, 15 May 2018 18:00:00 GMT

A giant 1924 explosion, when steam jets blew boulders from the summit, had many of the precursors we see now

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Decades-Old Data Unveils Plumes Spewing from Europa

Mon, 14 May 2018 15:00:00 GMT

Archived observations from NASA’s Galileo spacecraft all but confirm the Jovian moon’s subsurface ocean is within reach of future life-seeking missions 

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Google's AI Assistant Does Your Talk Tasks

Thu, 17 May 2018 19:38:00 GMT

The new Google AI voice assistant, called Duplex, highlights the intricacies of carrying out a mundane human-style conversation, as it keeps you off the phone.

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Is This Going to Be a Stand-Up Fight, Sir, or Another Sloth Hunt?

Sun, 20 May 2018 07:00:00 GMT

Ice age tracks show how humans harassed giant ground sloths

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


The Biggest Questions in Science

Tue, 15 May 2018 13:30:00 GMT



-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


Radar Scans Detail North Korean Nukes

Mon, 14 May 2018 23:25:00 GMT

Scientists have added radar info to seismic data, isotope measurements and optical imagery to study covert nuclear tests. Christopher Intagliata reports.

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


John Urschel's Favorite Theorem

Sat, 12 May 2018 20:00:00 GMT

In which we are honored to be the second-favorite podcast appearance of the only MIT applied math graduate student who has played in the NFL

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com